August 28, 2012

"You Can Play" @ DUKE

I first wrote about the NHL's "You Can Play" project back in March.  At the end of last school year, Risa and I approached our athletic department about producing a similar video.  Leslie Barnes and her team were instrumental over the summer in rounding up athletes, coaches, and members of the athletic department to participate in the project.  This week, we are thrilled to announce that Duke athletics is officially throwing its hat into the ring to combat homophobia in sports with its own "You Can Play" video.

You can see it here ==>>  You Can Play @ DUKE <<==


Feel free to check it out and share it with your friends and family.

Also, I'm running Athletes United this year.  Athletes United is a monthly discussion group for LGBTQ identified and questioning Duke varsity/club athletes and students that work closely with our teams.  The group creates a confidential, safe space for members to share personal experiences and discuss how to make the locker room and playing field an accepting environment for all athletes. Our first meeting is slated for Sunday, 9/16 at 6pm in the LGBT center.  If you are at all interested in finding out more information about the group, feel free to drop me (jmcginty321@gmail.com) or Dr. Janie Long (janie.long@duke.edu) a line.

Happy first week of classes everyone.

-John


August 27, 2012

Anonymous Posts (8.20.12-8.26.12)

Every week, we collect anonymous entries sent in using the link on our sidebar and post them all on Monday. We post anything as long as it doesn't contain personal attacks, hate speech, or express or insinuate that one is at risk for hurting themselves or someone else. Please read this for an explanation of this policy and seek help if your or a friend find yourself in that position. With those exceptions aside, please feel free to submit your thoughts and questions. :)

Hey y'all, thanks to all of you who came to the Center's Orientation Reception! It was great to see such a large turnout there. To any first years who may be reading the blog for the first time, most Mondays we have Anonymous Posts submitted from the sidebar. This week we didn't get any posts, so there obviously won't be any. If anybody is interested in writing for the blog on a regular schedule send an email to kab67@duke.edu. We'd love to have you!

Please remember that there are a number of resources available on campus and in the local community. resources are available over breaks and throughout the school year. If you or a friend are experiencing thoughts or urges to harm yourself or somebody else, please reach out to the following resources: In an emergency, please don't hesitate to call CAPS at any time, including "after hours" at (919) 966-3820. Ask to speak to the advice nurse and tell them you are a Duke student. You may also call the Trevor Project, a national hotline specifically for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer and questioning youth (college students included). Their number is 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386).

August 20, 2012

Anonymous Posts (8.13.12-8.19.12)

Every week, we collect anonymous entries sent in using the link on our sidebar and post them all on Monday. We post anything as long as it doesn't contain personal attacks, hate speech, or express or insinuate that one is at risk for hurting themselves or someone else. Please read this for an explanation of this policy and seek help if your or a friend find yourself in that position. With those exceptions aside, please feel free to submit your thoughts and questions. :)

Well, the beginning of the Fall Semester is right around the corner, and so LGBTQA Life on campus is starting off with some programming very soon. This Sunday the Center for LGBT Life will be holding its orientation reception. If you're around campus for that, be sure to come for some food, fun, and friends. Then that Thursday, August 30, the LGBT Center will be hosting OUTstravanganza together with Blue Devils United on East Campus. This event will be a lot of fun with ice cream and music right inside marketplace. What more could you want? 

Now, notes from OC:


#1
I'm out of an open relationship, and it's such a relief. We were together three years; I had fallen in love with him right away; but looking back on it, I can't get over the arrogance that came with his thoughts on non-monogamy, or the things I would put up with for the sake of accomodating his self-described "dominant" personality. Like, EVERY DAY he would find a reason to criticize monogamous/"straight-conforming" couples, and he was seriously incapable of walking past a guy who was his "type" (I, despite being his "love," was not) without eyeing him up and making some comment. If I would get into a funk, and ADMIT to him that I was jealous of someone, the anger and criticism I got in response was insane. "WHAT?" "Why don't you understand that my 'type' doesn't have to do with love?" "Why are you trying to control me?" "If you love me why do you want to limit what I do?" "This is how gays men date." And, maybe most annoyingly, "Why are you making this a big deal?" Don't get me wrong, I understand why (most) of these points can make sense in the right context. But at the same time, don't get on a soap box and preach. It drove me crazy how he would turn sluttiness into a bonafide virtue. No, I am not overjoyed to hear everyday that you love fucking short blonde boys, and no, that does not make my love inferior. We did have a good relationship in some regards, at some times. But damn, am I glad the jealousy/discomfort/shame/awkwardness/etc are finally over. It's hard to put just how good it feels to simply say, "Open dating is not for me." I feel like I wanna go to Disneyland.


Please remember that there are a number of resources available on campus and in the local community. resources are available over breaks and throughout the school year. If you or a friend are experiencing thoughts or urges to harm yourself or somebody else, please reach out to the following resources: In an emergency, please don't hesitate to call CAPS at any time, including "after hours" at (919) 966-3820. Ask to speak to the advice nurse and tell them you are a Duke student. You may also call the Trevor Project, a national hotline specifically for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer and questioning youth (college students included). Their number is 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386).

August 14, 2012

Gold

Major congrats to fellow Blue Devils Nick McCrory, Abby Johnston, and Coach K for their recent success across the pond at the 2012 London Games.  I was luckily enough to travel out to Las Vegas for a week in July to work with the men’s basketball team before Krzyzewski & Co. headed overseas.  I like to think America won gold because of my stellar performance shagging balls for KD, Lebron, and Kobe.  Probably has more to do with their sheer athleticism, talent, and basketball IQ.  But hey, I can dream.

I love the Olympics.  For two weeks, 11,000 athletes from over 200 countries come together to compete and celebrate everything we love about athletics.  I’ll leave it to twitter and the rest of the blogosphere to rant about the failures of NBC’s Olympic coverage.  I love twenty Michael Phelps interviews as much as the next kid, but there were so many compelling and moving personal narratives and storylines that went unnoticed to the American audience.  Let’s see how Team LGBT fared at London 2012:

  • For starters, over 100 out LGBT athletes have competed in the Summer Olympics over the years.


  • Tony Scupham-Bilton created a really cool cheat sheet that breaks down LGBT Olympians in past years, their sports, and how they fared in competition.

  • The Advocate kept a Team LGBT medal count during the 2012 Olympic games.  The results?  At least 23 out athletes/coaches competed this year, winning 10 medals.  7 Gold (4 women on the same Dutch field hockey team), 1 Silver, 2 Bronze.  That beats Jamaica, Ireland, and Argentina.


  • The Netherlands women’s field hockey team had four out athletes on its squad.  Two lesbian players, Carlien Dirske van den Huevel and team captain Maartje Paumen, scored the Dutch squad’s only goals as they defeated Argentina 2-0 to win the gold medal.

  • Seimone Augustus won gold for the USofA in women’s basketball. 

  • South African archer Karen Hultzer officially came out during the Olympics.  Part of her statement in an OutSports interview: “I am an archer, middle aged and a lesbian. I am also cranky before my first cup of coffee.  None of these aspects define who I am, they are simply a part of me.”

  • Ann Romney's horse Rafalca couldn’t slow down the queers either.  Great Britain’s dressage team, which includes out equestrian rider Carl Hester, took home the gold. The Dutch team and out rider Edward Gal took home bronze.  Maybe this was God’s way of punishing Ann for supporting a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage.  Or maybe her horse and rider were just sixth best.  Money can’t buy everything.

  • US women’s soccer coach Pia Sundhage and player Megan Rapinoe won gold in London.

Of course we need to brainstorm how LGBT athletes and allies can work together to create an environment where more than 23 athletes are out.  But for now lets take a moment and recognize the accomplishments of these individuals, the struggles they’ve overcome, and the ways in which they continue to inspire.