December 8, 2011

Integrity

Campus culture.

We're all a part of it. Most of us live here. Those of us who don't live here spend a great amount of our time here. We go to class,
we eat meals, we interact with faculty, and we attend parties. We're involved in countless organizations, we conduct groundbreaking research, and we push athletic limits.

We drink until we vomit. We'll never be as good as our peers. We reject others based on their position (or lack thereof) in the Greek system. We hurt collective groups of others and hide behind what we think is humor. We discriminate.

It might get better. "Duke isn't the real world."

Was Duke not the real world for the student who was assaulted after an on-campus party? Was Duke not the real world for someone who was rejected time after time for a major factor of identity or for just being themselves? Does all of that pain just go away after four years?

Our actions at Duke matter. The world after Duke is not identical to this university setting, but the effects last.

Those of us who went on Common Ground aren't innocent. Those of us who haven't gone aren't always guilty, either. We're all at fault, but we all have the capacity to change, to grow.

We can all use this time in which so much discussion and debate is developing between communities as well as within communities to learn and to express. We can use this time to take a stand for that which we wish social life at Duke could be. It's time to act on what we say we want to do in the comment sections of this blog, the Chronicle, and Develle Dish.

What do you value? What is it that you want? What do you think others want from you?

Whatever that may be:

Dear Duke guys world,

It's time for you to live in integrity.

3 comments:

  1. Thanks for this baby. I love seeing your face as you walk by my desk <3

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  2. Great job, Ryan. Very powerful.

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  3. The easiest answer to this is that all of us should think of the person we respect and trust most in this world - and then we should act just like them. Why is it that we often imitate the bad behaviors that are modeled for us, but we don't often imitate behaviors we really respect?

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