November 1, 2010

WOMYN Magazine Release!

Hello WOMYN! This is an exciting time!

We are very happy to announce that WOMYN magazine will be arriving to campus Undergraduate Publication Board (UPB) newsstands next Tuesday morning, November 9th! Be sure to grab your copy early that morning!

Secondly, we are having a celebratory WOMYN Release Party the night before the magazine hits campus, on Monday, November 8th, from 5:30-7pm in the LGBT Center. All LGBTQ women, members of the WOMYN review board, and those who submitted pieces to WOMYN magazine are welcome to attend.

Lastly, if for some reason you are unable to pick up your own physical copy of WOMYN before they run out, we will reserve permanant copies of the magazine in the Center for LGBT Life so that you can see it anytime you are on campus.

Thank you to everyone-get excited!!!!!
- Megan, Jack and Summer

11 comments:

  1. This. Will. Change. Everything. (!!)

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  2. What's the rationale behind the queer women + contributors only invite?

    (for those who dont know, I'm a contributor)..

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  3. hey E.F.! we do something very similar with only LGBTQQ women invited...and it's called Women Loving Women, so it's just sort of an extension on that group. We were able to foster a really great interaction among LGBTQQ women themselves at the Release Party tonight. It was essentially a WLW meeting, with the Review Board/Contributors also included, as well as the handing out of the publication too.

    We actually put the copies out on campus about 20 minutes later, so everyone else had access to the magazine really quickly.

    Yay for queer women!!! There will be copies on reserve in the Center for LGBT Life, the Special Collections Library and the Women's Center in case you don't get a chance to pick one up on camus this semester. hope this answers your question!
    -Megan

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  4. There's a large timeframe after publishing things that I'm actually terrified to read them in print, so this works best..
    Thanks Megan.

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  5. To all involved in the creation of Womyn Magazine:

    Have any of you ever hit a homerun your very first time at bat, or threw the football in the closing seconds of a tied game for a touchdown? Well if you have not, you should all know just how it feels, because you have done just that! The magazine is spectacular!

    K

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  6. Male sexed transgendered people have nothing to do with female sexed people. You cannot become a woman by co-opting the name woman, taking hormones, having surgery, conforming to sexual stereotypes, or by infiltrating the feminist movement. Being a woman is not a club which you can claim membership to by wearing the rite clothes, speaking in a high pitch voice, passing as a woman or trying to dominate and shame women by calling them trans phobic. Like many I have been raised in systems of patriarchal oppression, were I was made to believe that the most natural parts of me were inferior, wrong or discussing. Waking up is hard to do and I cannot shake off the effects of oppression overnight. I reject the female gender and the patriarchal lies that created it. So only now have I started to learn what it means to be a woman.

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  7. This is some transparently transphobic bullshit — which is all the more apparent because it's inherently contradictory.

    So you know how it feels to be forcibly gendered, to be pressed into a toxic societal position at the cost of who you really are? To be made to feel that the most natural parts of you are wrong and inferior? To reject your assigned gender, because you know it isn't right?

    Then you'd think you'd have some kind of empathy for other people's experiences of the same kind of pain. Even if it weren't so similar, I would hope that understanding the way that society has fundamentally changed and distorted your own life and identity would, you know, give you some idea of how deeply other people feel that pain.

    Even if you didn't think that was valid: this kind of blind hate is the reason that trans people can be harassed and assaulted and abused and murdered and fired and victimized and discriminated against and nobody feels bothered by it. Because they weren't "real women," right, they were freaks trying to be women. (And the entire idea that someone is lesser because they'd "try" to be a woman? Is predicated on misogyny and the devaluation of women.)

    So regardless of whether you think they're "real women" (ps: they are) — by posting this kind of shit, you are normalizing these attitudes and supporting violence against trans people.

    So, you know, congratulations on becoming the thing you hate.

    You're gross and you should feel gross.

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  8. This is some transparently transphobic bullshit — which is all the more apparent because it's inherently contradictory.

    So you know how it feels to be forcibly gendered, to be pressed into a toxic societal position at the cost of who you really are? To be made to feel that the most natural parts of you are wrong and inferior? To reject your assigned gender, because you know it isn't right?

    Then you'd think you'd have some kind of empathy for other people's experiences of the same kind of pain. Even if it weren't so similar, I would hope that understanding the way that society has fundamentally changed and distorted your own life and identity would, you know, give you some idea of how deeply other people feel that pain.

    Even if you didn't think that was valid: this kind of blind hate is the reason that trans people can be harassed and assaulted and abused and murdered and fired and victimized and discriminated against and nobody feels bothered by it. Because they weren't "real women," right, they were "freaks trying to be women." (And the entire idea that someone is lesser because they'd "try" to be a woman? Is predicated on misogyny and the devaluation of women.) By claiming that the only way to "be a woman" is to possess a specific set of reproductive organs, you're supporting ideas of femininity and womanhood that are inherently objectifying, patriarchal, and misogynistic themselves. Those are the very ideas that have been so hurtful to you, me, and billions of other women.

    So regardless of whether you think trans women are "real women" (ps: they are) — by posting this kind of shit, you are normalizing these attitudes and supporting violence against trans people.

    So, you know, congratulations on becoming the thing you hate.

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  9. I have to agree with Matti on this one. While I understand the value of a conversation about a womanhood beyond socially constructed gender roles, this is an unfair and frankly cruel way to frame the discussion.

    You are claiming that transwomen can never understand your experience, but if you're making that claim then you must recognize that you cannot know the experience of transwomen either. The gender roles that have oppressed you are the same social factors that oppress transpeople. I know that the struggles of being a woman in patriarchy are specific, but that does not mean that transwomen don't also suffer under many of these same specific struggles and more. You say that you are just discovering what it means to be a woman. If that is the case, then you cannot possibly have the authority to define who is and is not a "real woman." (Also, the idea that you have to have a certain set of characteristics to be valued in your body is perpetuating the gender roles that you claim to despise so much.) Just as you are parsing through the meaning of sex and gender, transwomen have probably spent the majority of their lives defining what womanhood means to them as well. Instead of assuming that your womanhood is the only "real" option, I feel almost certain that you (and all of the people in contact with you) would be better served if you considered that you may be able to widen your experience by learning about the womanhood of a transwoman. Or any other woman for that fact. Every woman has a different experience of patriarchy, sex, and gender. It is an incredibly personal experience. So if you are going to say that your womanhood is the definition of womanhood, then no one other than you would constitute a "real woman."

    By separating the experience of transwomen from the collective set of experiences that make up whatever your concept of "womanhood" is, you are discriminating in completely unfair ways, hurting people who are only trying to live in patriarchy, and cutting yourself off from valuable insights. I appreciate that you have suffered under patriarchy, but you cannot pass this suffering on to other people. Transwomen are women just as much as you or me or anyone else who identifies as a woman.

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